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In the Community

Marc Shoffman

Property staging firm secures £250,000 investment to...

A home staging firm that partners with estate agents...

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Graham Norwood

Labour warns against ‘watering down’ Renters Reform...

Labour has waded into the increasingly-fractious debate over the...

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And the lack of support from the Court system which causes unreasonable delays in helping a Landlord get THEIR PROPERTY back. When a Landlord has served notice (S21 or S8) that the contract is being terminated on X date, if the Tenant does not leave (or agree an extension) they therefore are illegally occupying the property and are squatting. I feel for tenants who genuinely have been trying to find property and are struggling to do so, contrary to popular belief I'm not actually a cold-hearted, callous 'female dog', but the legal owner wants possession of their property back for a reason and they should be legally entitled to help to do so. Local authorities telling tenants not to leave and wait for a possession warrant are making the situation worse...

Greg Bjorg

re: renovation and problems with it ...

My first self-repair did not end too well. I...

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Graham Norwood

Investor opportunities as down-valuations increase ...

New reports suggest down valuations are increasing and properties...

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Surveyors need to be impartial and value things at a reasonable value. Not high or low.

Charlie Davidson

Property expert slams 1% mortgages as Government...

The Government’s proposal to introduce a new 1% deposit...

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Karl Knipe

The pros and cons of student accommodation...

Some property investors are put off student accommodation by...

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Great information!!

Angels Media

FUTURE: PROPERTY TECH ...

Join us to network, learn & share idea's with...

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Graham Norwood

Capital Appreciation - UK winners and losers...

Average house prices rose £7,599 in Scotland last year...

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Graham Norwood

FCA launches working group to probe interest-only...

The Financial Conduct Authority is working with 12 lenders...

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Steph Rady

INTERIOR DESIGN TRENDS TO EXPECT IN 2017:...

Kicking off 2017, we’ve predicted stabilisation in the property...

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Martin Gibbon

First Time Buyers Underestimating the Cost of...

The majority of aspiring first-time buyers ‘wildly’ underestimate how...

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roof repairs ipswitch

Sell your home this summer - House...

Summer is just around the corner. And, contrary to...

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Nat Daniels

Got lots to say about property? You're...

Here is your opportunity to get all your latest property-related...

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2.8 million new instructions- who wants some? While preparing a submission for the at the time unannounced CLG inquiry in PRS (CLG only told their friends) I did some number crunching in the hope of adding a positive input into a department that is seemingly bereft of any experience of the Private rented sector and almost allergic to anyone who has. I identified that a 100,000 tenancy provision by private landlords into the assisted tenancy market (pensions and benefits) was worth approaching £1 billion to landlords. One hundred thousand tenancies was a deliberately small percentage ; an easy , appropriately sized sample to make the point rather than a scientifically calculated figure. It represented about 1.4% of the middle ground between PRS and social housing that many agencies and landlords steer clear of. Subsequent research (discussion) shows that about 40% of assisted tenants are no worse at paying their rent than anyone else. Essentially what that means is that there is an additional £28 billion rental opportunity for those prepared to engage the sector. Increasing the PRS provision by up to by 70% is surely a good start in solving the housing crisis. It will obviously put a large rental income in the pocket of those who can afford to buy to rent out, it will put a large commission income in the pockets of those servicing the industry but moreover it will add the incentive to have another 2.8 million private rented sector properties available to ease the housing crisis. Obviously that will leave the remaining 60% of the sector to house but it seems reasonable that government doesn’t attempt to privatise their entire housing obligation, such schemes tend to lead to civil unrest. There will be natural envy at the rich seemingly exploiting the poor, I am not getting into the social ethics of a solution, simply suggesting how a set of government departments could set about solving issues in an industry they don’t properly understand.

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